Eastern Religions

Note: Yoga is not a religion, but rather a collective term for various spiritual practices and disciplines common to most branches of Hinduism. The Bhagavad Gita is the archetype of Yoga scripture. Capturing the essence and at the same time going into detail about the various Yogas and their philosophies, it was the groundstone to Yogic thought, and constantly refers to itself as such, the "Scripture of Yoga" (see the final verses of each chapter).

Vedic religions (Hinduism)

Note: Yoga is not a religion, but rather a collective term for various spiritual practices and disciplines common to most branches of Hinduism. The Bhagavad Gita is the archetype of Yoga scripture. Capturing the essence and at the same time going into detail about the various Yogas and their philosophies, it was the groundstone to Yogic thought, and constantly refers to itself as such, the "Scripture of Yoga" (see the final verses of each chapter).

Non-Vedic Indo-Persian religions

The way of the Mahayana, developed from the earlier and more austere Theravada school of Buddhism, tends to be characterized by a greater emphasis of the supernatural. These include from celestial realms and powers, to a spectrum of Bodhisattvas, both human and seemingly godlike, who can assist believers.

Religions of Far Eastern origin

Caodaists believe that there is only one God, the same one who created all the major religions of the world such as Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Spiritualism.
Adherents engage in ethical practices such as prayer, veneration of ancestors, nonviolence, and vegetarianism with the goal of, minimally, obtaining a favorable rebirth, or, better yet, entering heaven, or, ultimately, escape from the cycle of birth and death. Three Saints revered in Cao Dai are Sun Yat Sen (1866-1925), Victor Hugo (1802-1885), and Nguyen Binh Khiem (1492-1587). They are depicted in a painting, signing a covenant with God.
God is symbolized by the Divine Eye, specifically the left eye.
The faith has a hierarchical organization resembling that of the Roman Catholic Church, with a pope, cardinals, bishops, and priests. Ordained women may attain ranks up to cardinal.Followers of Cao Dai believe that its teachings, symbolism and organization were communicated directly from God; even the construction of the Tay Ninh Holy See had divine guidance.
Cao Dai currently has an estimated seven to eight million adherents in Vietnam, and an additional 30,000 (primarily ethnic Vietnamese) in the United States, Europe, and Australia.


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